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Lynching announcements from New Orleans States and Jackson Daily News reproduced in The Crisis, August 1919.

The Crisis magazine was established by W.E.B. DuBois in 1910 as the official magazine of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). These lynching announcements from southern newspapers were reprinted in The Crisis accompanying a column headed “Crime” listing a number of recent lynchings in the South. The reproduced headlines from New Orleans and Jackson refer to a man named John Hartfield, who was hanged, shot, and burned to death on June 26, 1919 for allegedly having a relationship with a white woman.

Transcript:

The Crisis
(Reprinted from the NEW ORLEANS STATES)

3,000 WILL BURN NEGRO
Kaiser Under Stronger Guard Following Escape of Crown Prince
Frank Simonds Writes for Tates
NEW ORLEANS STATES
VOL 39 NO 177 New Orleans, La. Thursday, June 26, 1919

(Reprinted from the JACKSON DAILY NEWS)
JOHN HARTFIELD WILL BE
LYNCHED BY ELLISVILLE MOB
AT 5 O’CLOCK THIS AFTERNOON
Governor Bilbo Says He Is Powerless to Prevent It -- Thousands of People Are Flocking Into Ellisville to Attend the Event -- Sheriff and Authorities Are Powerless to Prevent It.

Hattiesburg, June 26. -- John Hartfield, the negro alleged to have assaulted an Ellisville, young woman, has been taken to Ellisville and is guarded by officers in the office of Dr. Carter in that city. He is wounded in the shoulder but not seriously. The officers have agreed to turn him over to the people of the city at 4 o’clock this afternoon when it is expected he will be burned. The negro is said to have made a partial confession.

Gov. Bilbo Says
He is Powerless.
When Gov. Bilbo was shown the above dispatch and asked what action if any, he intended to take to prevent the affair, he said:
“I am powerless to prevent it. We have guns for state militia but no men. It is impossible to send troops to the scene for the obvious reason that we have no troops. “Several days ago anticipating… [missing]

...for the lynching has now been fixed for five p.m.
A committee of Ellisville citizens has been appointed to make the necessary arrangements for the event, and the mob is pledged to act in conformity with these arrangements.
Rev. L.G. Bates, pastor of the First Baptist church of Laurel, left here at one o’clock for Ellisville to entreat the mob to use discretion.