News Archive

84 posts found under Content Showcase. Showing page 2 of 5.

100 Primary Source Sets for Education Now Available

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is very pleased to announce the release of its third group of Primary Source Sets about topics in US history, literature, and culture, along with new features for navigating our growing project.

April 11, 2016

Color Our Collections!

Join the adult coloring craze and put your colorful spin on these illustrations from our collection.

February 1, 2016

New Primary Source Sets for Education Published

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is very pleased to announce the release of its second group of Primary Source Sets about topics in US history, literature, and culture, along with new features for navigating our growing project.

January 20, 2016

Spotlight on Immigrant Stories

Fifty years ago this October, the Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 was signed into law, forever changing American immigration policy and the country’s demographics. The 1965 law abolished quota systems established in the 1920s that put restrictions on earlier waves of immigration, and allowed for many groups of non-European immigrants to enter the country.

October 27, 2015

New Primary Source Sets for Education

Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is very pleased to announce the release of its first group of Primary Source Sets about topics in US history, literature, and culture. These sets were developed and reviewed by a new Education Advisory Committee for use by students and teachers in grades 6-12 and higher education. Each set includes an overview, ten to fifteen primary sources, links to additional resources, and a teaching guide. This project was generously funded by the Whiting Foundation.

October 20, 2015

Unexpected: Getting Fit (the 19th Century Way)

This month will mark the 111th annual World Series of Baseball. As the final teams of the National and American Leagues battle it out in their divisional series, DPLA takes a look back at a type of publication that arose during baseball’s formative years: 19th century sports or fitness manuals.

October 15, 2015

The March on Washington: Hear the Call

Fifty-two years ago this week, more than 200,000 Americans came together in the nation’s capitol to rally in support of the ongoing Civil Rights movement. It was at that march that Martin Luther King Jr.’s iconic “I Have A Dream” speech was delivered. And it was at that march that the course of American history was forever […]

August 27, 2015

Unexpected: Animals do the most amazing things

We’ve always had a strange relationship with animals. Some are beloved family members, we farm, hunt, and fish others, and we are awestruck by some for their natural beauty and power. Whatever we think of them, we love to photograph them. And, that’s been the case since the camera started to capture their likenesses in the 19th Century.

August 19, 2015

Summer of Space Exploration

This summer has been one full of space exploration. NASA’s New Horizons mission brought us new discoveries and breathtaking images of Pluto. July and August also marked a host of scientific milestones, marking man’s first walk on the moon, among other breakthroughs that helped pave the way for New Horizons. You can explore some of the milestones of American space exploration in the DPLA collections.

August 5, 2015

Unexpected: Hit the Road

Americans across the decades have been drawn to the allure of the open road. It’s become a cultural touchstone, a theme in our music, our novels, our history, of getting behind the wheel and seeing the country. Here are some historic images and driving tips from the DPLA collection to inspire your next road trip.

July 16, 2015

Look up in the sky! It’s an Air Force UFO!

This week in 1947, front page headlines reported a crash on a ranch outside of Roswell, New Mexico. The catch? The crash object was described as a “flying disk,” beginning decades of flying saucer theories and Roswell alien rumors. The idea of the flying saucer was so pervasive that it inspired countless books, movies, TV […]

July 10, 2015

Preserving the Star-Spangled Banner

The tune of the “Star-Spangled Banner” is one that will be played at picnics, fireworks displays, and other Fourth of July celebrations across the country this weekend. But the “broad stripes and bright stars” of the original flag that flew over Fort McHenry in 1814–inspiring Francis Scott Key to pen the iconic poem–have required some […]

July 3, 2015

We, Robots: Robots from the 1920s to the 1990s

This is the third post in our Unexpected series which covers thematic discoveries in our collection. In case you missed it, the first post covered unusual snow removal machines, while the second covered football.

June 16, 2015

Hit the Trail: Camping in America

For generations of Americans, a favorite kick-off to the summer season is taking to the trails on a camping trip. Whether it’s packing up the family RV, or kids kayaking at their favorite sleepaway camp, it’s a way Americans have enjoyed spending the summer for decades.

June 4, 2015

Presidents and Their Libraries

Earlier this month it was announced the President Barack Obama’s Presidential Library will be built on the south side of Chicago. It will be our 14th Presidential Library. The idea originated with FDR who in his second term “on the advice of noted historians and scholars, established a public repository to preserve the evidence of the Presidency for future generations” Then in 1955, Congress passed the Presidential Libraries Act, establishing a system of privately erected and federally maintained libraries. Here’s a sampling of images from the Digital Public Library of America related to our presidents and their libraries.

May 26, 2015

New exhibition on track: “Building the First Transcontinental Railroad”

While the United States was in the midst of the Civil War, the country was also making one of its greatest breakthroughs in transportation—the Transcontinental Railroad. From the railroad’s war-weary beginnings, to the last Golden Spike at Promontory Summit in Utah on May 10, 1869, the railroad’s development forever changed American travel and communication. It also had long-reaching and irrevocable impacts on the lives of Native Americans and Chinese immigrant laborers, who bore the brunt of the treacherous tunneling and track-laying across the country. Our newest exhibition “Building the Transcontinental Railroad” explores the railroad’s construction and its impact on American culture and westward expansion.

May 7, 2015

New exhibition on the American Civil War now available

Our newest exhibition, “Torn in Two: Mapping the American Civil War,” tells the story of the American Civil War both nationally and locally in Boston, Massachusetts, through maps, documents, letters, and other primary sources.

April 29, 2015

From Book Patrol: Poetry is Wanted Here!

Happy National Poetry Month! Here’s a taste of just some of the poetry goodness that lives within the confines of the Digital Public Library of America. From the postcard featuring an excerpt from a poem by Alex Caldero proclaiming ‘Poetry is wanted here!’, to a sampling a of dust jackets, to a lunch poem from second graders, poetry is alive and well at DPLA.

April 27, 2015