• Creator
  • Illinois Heritage Association
  • Created Date
  • 02/18/03
  • Description
  • This five-dollar note is from The Augusta Insurance and Banking Company. The number 205 appears and "Will pay FIVE DOLLARS to bearer on demand." Then there is the word "Augusta," followed by an illegible word. The note is signed at the bottom by the cashier and the president, and around the edges is written "Five" and "State of Georgia." The paper is tan with black and red printing. There are several allegorical images on the bill. Soon after ... more
    This five-dollar note is from The Augusta Insurance and Banking Company. The number 205 appears and "Will pay FIVE DOLLARS to bearer on demand." Then there is the word "Augusta," followed by an illegible word. The note is signed at the bottom by the cashier and the president, and around the edges is written "Five" and "State of Georgia." The paper is tan with black and red printing. There are several allegorical images on the bill. Soon after the Civil War began, the South began printing money. Well into the twentieth century the saying persisted, "Save your Confederate money, boys, the South will rise again,' although few people had ever seen a piece of Confederate money. This bill is identified as Civil War money by an inscription on the envelope in which it was found. It was placed in a box in the City Building of Champaign, Illinois, in 1889. (See source.) The note is in excellent condition. It has been backed to give it stability, so it is not possible to see whether there was any writing on the reverse. How we learn about communities; Communities and Geography; History of Money. 15 Economics; 16 History. less
  • Format
  • IHA00261.jpg