• Creator
  • Unknown
  • Created Date
  • 10-03-03
  • Description
  • Episcopal clergyman Charles Dresser married Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd on the evening of November 4, 1842. Eighteen months later on May 2, 1844, Dresser sold his house at Eighth and Jackson Streets to the Lincolns. The Lincolns then moved into the only home they would ever own. The purchase price was $1,500, consisting of $1,200 in cash plus a downtown lot and building worth $300. The Dresser cottage was a one-and-one-half story, Greek Revi... more
    Episcopal clergyman Charles Dresser married Abraham Lincoln and Mary Todd on the evening of November 4, 1842. Eighteen months later on May 2, 1844, Dresser sold his house at Eighth and Jackson Streets to the Lincolns. The Lincolns then moved into the only home they would ever own. The purchase price was $1,500, consisting of $1,200 in cash plus a downtown lot and building worth $300. The Dresser cottage was a one-and-one-half story, Greek Revival style structure built in 1839. It stood on a 50-by-152 foot corner lot. The house was of braced-frame oak construction. Black walnut was used for exterior and interior trim, doors, siding, and shingles. Lumber was from trees native to the Springfield area. The primary reason Abraham Lincoln moved to Springfield, was that city had become a focal point of law, politics, and state government when it became the Illinois state capital in 1839. However, in this frontier, pigs, chickens, and even cattle continued to roam freely in its streets. How we learn about communities; Antebellum Society and the Civil War. 16 History. less
  • Format
  • Modellincolnhome.jpg