• Creator
  • Anagnos, Michael, 1837-1906
  • Created Date
  • 1887
  • Description
  • September 1st My dear Annie, I was delighted to receive your letter of the 23rd ultimo, and I need scarcely say, that I have read with a most profound interest your account of Helen's remarkable progress and attainments. Her note to cousin George is the best and most convincing proof of the marvelous work, which has been accomplished during the past six months. Dear Annie, I am aware of the many difficulties of your position and of the thorns ... more
    September 1st My dear Annie, I was delighted to receive your letter of the 23rd ultimo, and I need scarcely say, that I have read with a most profound interest your account of Helen's remarkable progress and attainments. Her note to cousin George is the best and most convincing proof of the marvelous work, which has been accomplished during the past six months. Dear Annie, I am aware of the many difficulties of your position and of the thorns which are scattered on your pathway: but take as little notice of them as possible. Remember always the following words of Horace, - "Tu ne cede malis, sed contra audentior ito," which may be interpreted in your case, "Yield not to trials, but on the contrary, meet them with fortitude." Do not allow yourself to be troubled by petty annoyances, or to remember them and harbor ill feelings even temporarily against anyone, however ignorant or indiscreet he or she may be. Look steadily at the polar star of your work, and I have not the slightest doubt but that you will weather all of your storms and reach the port of success. Perseverance, patience, trust and charity will help you to conquer the most formitable difficulties. Then the crown will be yours as the prize of victory. Your strenuous efforts have been so far richly rewarded, and you have good reasons to be proud of your achievements. Now, dear Annie, I am going to bother you with an earnest request. I want you to prepare for our forthcoming annual report a brief account of Helen's history and education, giving her age, the cause of her blindness and deafness, her temperament, her natural aptitude, the steps taken and the methods employed in her training, and what has already been accomplished. I ask you to do this for your own sake and for the credit of your alma mater; and, after saying "oh dear! oh dear!" as many times as you please, pray go right to work and write a little every day until the paper is finished. I send you the writing-boards and the alphabet sheets with much love, and I remain, Ever sincerely your friend M. Anagnos Miss Annie M. Sullivan Tucsumbia, Alabama. Letter from Michael Anagnos, director of Perkins School for the Blind, to Annie Sullivan. Anagnos was responsible for sending Anne Sullivan to Tuscumbia, Alabama to teach Helen Keller. The letter discusses observations and details relating to the early education of Helen Keller. Michael Anagnos. less
  • Format
  • Correspondence
    Letter
  • Rights
  • Samuel P. Hayes Research Library, Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA. Contact host institution for more information.