• Creator
  • Springfield College
  • Created Date
  • 2011-04-12
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • This video shows a lecture given by the Dr. Robert Barkman, who served as Springfield College’s Distinguished Professor of Humanics during the 2010-2011 academic year. The lecture, titled “It’s Not About the Banjo, It’s About the Student,” was given on April 12, 2011 at 4 p.m. in the Appleton Auditorium at the Fuller Arts Center. The video opens with Dr. Jean A. Wyld, the school’s vice president of academic affairs and professor of biology, we... more
    This video shows a lecture given by the Dr. Robert Barkman, who served as Springfield College’s Distinguished Professor of Humanics during the 2010-2011 academic year. The lecture, titled “It’s Not About the Banjo, It’s About the Student,” was given on April 12, 2011 at 4 p.m. in the Appleton Auditorium at the Fuller Arts Center. The video opens with Dr. Jean A. Wyld, the school’s vice president of academic affairs and professor of biology, welcoming the audience and introducing Dr. Richard B. Flynn, Springfield College’s twelfth president. Dr. Flynn then announces the school’s outstanding reaccreditation, thanks a number of professors, and describes the objectives of the Humanics Lecture Series. Dr. Flynn ends by discussing the history of Humanics. Dr. Wyld then recognizes the Distinguished Professors of Humanics who are present and describes Dr. Barkman’s contributions. Dr. Barkman begins his lecture, which is accompanied by a powerpoint, with a clip of Miley Cyrus’ “Party in the USA.” He follows by acknowledging his family, friends, and coworkers. During his year as Distinguished Professor of Humanics, Dr. Barkman spoke with both students and faculty about teaching. Based on the transcripts, he created a word cloud, which he shared along with quotes during the lecture. Dr. Barkman then describes the purpose and outcomes of the 2011 Faculty Institute. At twenty-nine minutes into the video, he begins to show series of eleven videos. In the first video, he explains the importance of teaching students critical thinking. In the second video, Ruth West describes how she prepares herself to teach. The third video shows Elizabeth Montemagni talking about her relationship with her students. The fourth and fifth videos show Jen Stratton and Eileen Cyr discussing their expectations of students. In the sixth video, Bob Hewes describes how he instructs his class. The seventh and eighth videos show Margaret Lloyd and Ron Maggio talking about how they treat their students. In the ninth video, Frank Torres discusses how he evaluates both his students and himself. In the tenth and eleventh videos, Herb Zettl and Peter Polito talk about their journeys to teaching. Robert Barkman ends the lecture by suggesting how his project could continue in the future. Jean Wyld then presents him with the Humanics Pin and introduces the 2011-2012 Distinguished Professor of Humanics, Naomi Graves. In 1962, Dr. Glenn Olds, President of Springfield College at the time, began to wonder why this name was given to the intended philosophy of the college by Dr. Laurence Locke Doggett, Springfield College’s first full-time president. Olds acknowledged that the practices of the faculty were in large part consistent with the Humanics philosophy, but he believed that a more self-conscious application would improve chances of its continuity and survival. To ensure this, a Distinguished Professor of Humanics position was created at the college, first filled by Dr. Seth Arsenian from 1966-1969. The purpose of this position was to catalyze a renewal of consciousness in the philosophy. This was done by annually mandating the Distinguished Professor of Humanics to give a Humanics lecture on the definition of Humanics and what the concept means to them. Arsenian started this tradition in 1967 with his speech titled, “The Meaning of Humanics,” in which he described the concept as a set of ideas, values, and goals that make our college distinct from other colleges and make commitment and unity toward commonly sought goals possible. To see the PowerPoint presentation - http://cdm16122.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p15370coll2/id/7840. less
  • Format
  • Motion pictures
  • Rights
  • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information.