• Creator
  • Sierra-Perry, Martha, 1949-
  • Created Date
  • 09/06/02
  • Description
  • Considered to be the first digital computer, Howard Aiken's Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator (the IBM ASCC) or Mark I, was developed between 1937-1944. When it was completed it had many functions: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, plus logarithms and trigonometric functions. It had an accuracy of 23 decimal place numbers. It measured 51 feet long, 8 feet high and 2 feet wide and weighed over 5 tons. Today, the Mark I ... more
    Considered to be the first digital computer, Howard Aiken's Automatic Sequence Controlled Calculator (the IBM ASCC) or Mark I, was developed between 1937-1944. When it was completed it had many functions: addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, plus logarithms and trigonometric functions. It had an accuracy of 23 decimal place numbers. It measured 51 feet long, 8 feet high and 2 feet wide and weighed over 5 tons. Today, the Mark I has been split up and divided between Harvard (Science Center), the Smithsonian Institute, and IBM (Historical Collection). Image taken August 8, 2002, Harvard Science Center, Cambridge, MA. For further information refer to: "Howard Aiken: Portrait of a Computer Pioneer," by Bernard Cohen (MIT Press, 1999). Also note its companion piece, "Makin' Numbers: Howard Aiken and the Computer," edited by Bernard Cohen and Gregory with Welch (MIT Press 1999). Using a Calculator; Using a Computer to make a graph. 13 Science, Technology and Society. less
  • Format
  • Aikencalc.jpg