Zanzibar skyline and palace

Chicago citation style
Sultan Said Seyyid?, Juli McGruder. Zanzibar skyline and palace. Palace complex was built in the 1830s by Sultan Said Seyyid (1791-18-56), founder of Busaidi dynasty. After building the palace complex he moved his capital from Oman to Zanzibar (1840). Complex included palace itself (Beit al-Sahel), harem building (Beit al-Hukm) and "The House of Wonder" (Beit al-Ajaib). These were connected by wikios (covered upper story walkways). The central building (the harem) and much of the ornate wooden portion of the Palace itself were destroyed when the English bombarded the complex in 1896. In the same bombardment the clocktower that stood before the House of Wonder was ruined. In rebuilding the House of Wonder, builders incorporated the clock tower into the main building, as it is seen in these photo. This structure was apparently considered quite an architectural marvel in its time; the exterior support columns are metal. (cf. pp 52-63 in Sheriff's "Historical Zanzibar," and p 68 in Colonial Offices's "Introducing East Africa."). Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://cdm16786.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/buildings/id/5862. (Accessed July 22, 2018.)
APA citation style
Sultan Said Seyyid?, Juli McGruder, (Palace complex was built in the 1830s by Sultan Said Seyyid (1791-18-56), founder of Busaidi dynasty. After building the palace complex he moved his capital from Oman to Zanzibar (1840). Complex included palace itself (Beit al-Sahel), harem building (Beit al-Hukm) and "The House of Wonder" (Beit al-Ajaib). These were connected by wikios (covered upper story walkways). The central building (the harem) and much of the ornate wooden portion of the Palace itself were destroyed when the English bombarded the complex in 1896. In the same bombardment the clocktower that stood before the House of Wonder was ruined. In rebuilding the House of Wonder, builders incorporated the clock tower into the main building, as it is seen in these photo. This structure was apparently considered quite an architectural marvel in its time; the exterior support columns are metal. (cf. pp 52-63 in Sheriff's "Historical Zanzibar," and p 68 in Colonial Offices's "Introducing East Africa.")) Zanzibar skyline and palace. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://cdm16786.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/buildings/id/5862
MLA citation style
Sultan Said Seyyid?, Juli McGruder. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <http://cdm16786.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/buildings/id/5862>.
Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.