• Creator
  • Grimaldi, Matthew F
  • Created Date
  • 1970-05-29
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • A photograph of Charles Weckwerth '31, standing at the podium, giving a speech at the dedication of Springfield College dormitory, Gulick Hall. The brick wall behind Weckwerth is decorated with tissue paper flowers and posters of Hawaii, Luther Halsey Gulick's birthplace. Construction on Gulick Hall began in the summer of 1968 and was completed in September of 1969. The dedication was held at the conclusion of the school year on May 29th, 1970... more
    A photograph of Charles Weckwerth '31, standing at the podium, giving a speech at the dedication of Springfield College dormitory, Gulick Hall. The brick wall behind Weckwerth is decorated with tissue paper flowers and posters of Hawaii, Luther Halsey Gulick's birthplace. Construction on Gulick Hall began in the summer of 1968 and was completed in September of 1969. The dedication was held at the conclusion of the school year on May 29th, 1970. The dormitory was named for Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick who served as the college’s first physical training department director and is credited with creating Springfield College’s official seal, the inverted triangle, as well as the college’s Humanics philosophy of educating the whole person in “spirit, mind and body”. Gulick Hall was the first dorm to break the tradition of males and females having completely separate dorm buildings. Though Massasoit was the first dormitory to change from a single-sex dorm to a co-ed dorm in 1969, Gulick was the first dormitory built with the intention to house both men and women. Gulick had sections designated for males and females, explaining the complicated interior structure in which there are different letter/floor names, and different areas which are often surprisingly hard to get to. Today, Gulick Hall houses just under 300 first-year students, almost half the freshmen class. less
  • Format
  • Photographs
  • Rights
  • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information.