• Creator
  • Luneen, John, 1893-1906
  • Created Date
  • 8-19-02
  • Description
  • The John Luneen journal and souvenir scrapbook has forty-four pages. The front and back covers are covered with marbleized paper. The journal is filled with postcards, maps, and commercial fliers from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. There are postcards of the Electricity Building; three postcards from piano manufacturers A.B. Chase Piano Co., Everett Piano, and Mason an illustrated postcard of the Ferris wheel; two postcards from Woonso... more
    The John Luneen journal and souvenir scrapbook has forty-four pages. The front and back covers are covered with marbleized paper. The journal is filled with postcards, maps, and commercial fliers from the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition. There are postcards of the Electricity Building; three postcards from piano manufacturers A.B. Chase Piano Co., Everett Piano, and Mason an illustrated postcard of the Ferris wheel; two postcards from Woonsocket Rhode Island, advertising a shoemaker. The maps are by Rand McNally illustrating the entire fairgrounds, and by David Bradley (farm equipment producer) of Chicago. There is a commercial flier promoting good health with 'Aerated Waters' from the William Corry and Company of Belfast, Ireland and a wallet-sized calendar for the year of 1893 by The American Cotton Oil Company. This journal and souvenir book was compiled and written by John Luneen (1893-1906) from Carrollton, Illinois. He attended the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893 at the age of fifteen. Luneen wrote in the scrapbook that he rode the Ferris wheel on October 12, 1893. The Ferris wheel rose 264 feet into the air. Weighing forty-six tons and being forty-five feet long, the Ferris wheel’s axle shaft was considered to be the heaviest piece of steel ever forged. At full capacity 2,160 people could be carried upward in the thirty-six railcars. Each railcar could carry sixty passengers, forty of whom could sit on plush-covered swivel chairs. A complete ride lasted twenty minutes. The Ferris wheel made six stops per revolution; at each stop, six cars were unloaded. From opening day May 1, 1893, to closing day on October 29, 1893, more than 1.5 million people paid fifty cents to take a ride. The Ferris wheel was a highlight of Chicago’s World’s Columbian Exposition. How we learn about communities; Exploring The Columbian Exposition. 16 History; 10-12 Science; 13 Science, Technology and Society. less
  • Format
  • JOHNLUNE.jpg