• Creator
  • Illinois Heritage Association
  • Created Date
  • 02/18/03
  • Description
  • A left-facing portrait of Miss Liberty. She wears a crown on which is written LIBERTY. A few wheat leaves are stuck in the crown. At the back of her curly hair, she wears a Phrygian cap. Above her head is E PLURIBUS UNUM and below, the date. Silver coins disappeared from circulation in the early 1850s because they contained more silver bullion than the face value of the coins. Face value is the sum for which a coin can be spent or exchanged. T... more
    A left-facing portrait of Miss Liberty. She wears a crown on which is written LIBERTY. A few wheat leaves are stuck in the crown. At the back of her curly hair, she wears a Phrygian cap. Above her head is E PLURIBUS UNUM and below, the date. Silver coins disappeared from circulation in the early 1850s because they contained more silver bullion than the face value of the coins. Face value is the sum for which a coin can be spent or exchanged. The coinage Act of 1873 abolished the Seated Liberty silver dollar, half-dime, and dime. By 1878, the Bland-Allison Act, in support of the silver-mining interests put a new silver dollar on the market. Congress authorized the purchase of large amounts of silver for the new coins. The Liberty Head silver dollar was designed by George T. Morgan, assistant engraver at the Philadelphia Mint, and the coins were also called Morgans. The artist based the portrait of Miss Liberty on a Philadelphia school teacher. Source: http://www.workingmancoins.com/History/Dol/MorgH.htm. How we learn about communities; Communities and Geography; History of Money. 15 Economics; 16 History. less
  • Format
  • IHA00248.jpg