• Creator
  • Unknown
  • Created Date
  • 8-18-03
  • Description
  • Photograph, b/w. National Director of the WPA/FAP speaking at the dedication of James Michael Newell’s murals at Evander Childs High School, Bronx, New York, November 1938. In January 1933, approximately 1,500,000 workers in Illinois were unemployed. The seriousness of the condition in Illinois alone is indicated by the fact that during the month of May 1934, 15.3% of the total population of the State of Illinois (according to the 1930 census)... more
    Photograph, b/w. National Director of the WPA/FAP speaking at the dedication of James Michael Newell’s murals at Evander Childs High School, Bronx, New York, November 1938. In January 1933, approximately 1,500,000 workers in Illinois were unemployed. The seriousness of the condition in Illinois alone is indicated by the fact that during the month of May 1934, 15.3% of the total population of the State of Illinois (according to the 1930 census) or 1,033,527 persons received public relief. The Works Progress Administration (WPA) was established by the President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1935 to help alleviate some of the economic problems caused by the Great Depression. The Federal Art Project (FAP) quickly became the main employer of artists in the United States. By 1938 the FAP existed in all 48 states. In Illinois the Project employed 375 artists, craftsmen, and administrative workers (source: Achievements of WPA Workers in Illinois: July 1st 1935-June 30th 1938, issued by Information Service, Works Progress Administration [Illinois]). Although the FAPs budget was only about one percent of the WPAs total expenditure, its output was as significant as the dams, roads, public housing, hospitals, job training, and educational services provided by other branches of the WPA. The FAP maintained over 100 Community Art Centers around the country, held regular exhibitions, and offered art classes to the public. The philosophy of these art centers was that the spiritual and aesthetic pleasures of art should be available to the widest audience possible, not reserved for the educated elite. Understanding civilizations through art. 16 History; 25-27 Fine Arts. less
  • Format
  • Hcahill