• Creator
  • Early American Museum
  • Created Date
  • 8-3-00
  • Description
  • Tin hog-scraper style candlestick. Has a round concave base with a tin cylinder protruding upwards from the center and a flattened lip with a short flat handle. 5" high. Candle drippings cover the entire base and cylinder. The height adjustment lever on the stand is missing. It’s hard to imagine just how dark buildings were at night before electricity. Depending on the time period people lit their homes with whale oil lamps, candles, kerosene,... more
    Tin hog-scraper style candlestick. Has a round concave base with a tin cylinder protruding upwards from the center and a flattened lip with a short flat handle. 5" high. Candle drippings cover the entire base and cylinder. The height adjustment lever on the stand is missing. It’s hard to imagine just how dark buildings were at night before electricity. Depending on the time period people lit their homes with whale oil lamps, candles, kerosene, or gas. Candles could be made at home and provided a portable light. Candles were made out of tallow or beeswax. Beeswax was expensive and harder to get so tallow candles were much more common. Tallow is the hard fat from sheep, cows, or deer. Most candles were used in the winter. In the summer people got up early and went to bed when it got too dark to see. Candles were made in several ways. One method was to dip the wick into hot tallow or wax until the candle was the right size, another was to pour liquid tallow into a mold. A good candle maker could make about 200 candles a day. Westward Expansion. 16 History; 15 Economics. less
  • Format
  • 68.1.1914.jpg