• Description
  • Descended from the early Puritan settlers, Nathaniel Hawthorne drew upon his knowledge of both family and local history to create the plots and settings for such highly regarded works as The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851). Hawthorne's evocation of old New England added an important dimension to his fiction, but it was his exploration of the psychological and moral aspects of the human condition that distinguishe... more
    Descended from the early Puritan settlers, Nathaniel Hawthorne drew upon his knowledge of both family and local history to create the plots and settings for such highly regarded works as The Scarlet Letter (1850) and The House of the Seven Gables (1851). Hawthorne's evocation of old New England added an important dimension to his fiction, but it was his exploration of the psychological and moral aspects of the human condition that distinguished his work, giving it a universal quality that raised it far above the realm of regional literature. Despite the widespread popularity of his novels and short stories, Hawthorne suffered financially from the lack of international copyright protection when unauthorized editions of his books were published abroad. And he never earned more than $1,500 from his sales at home, largely because the market was flooded with cut-rate editions of works by celebrated British authors. less
  • Format
  • Modern albumen print from wet plate collodion negative
  • Rights
  • National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution