• Creator
  • Jenney, William Le Baron, 1832-1907
  • Created Date
  • 8-19-02
  • Description
  • A window frame from between the third and fourth floors of the Home Insurance Building. It is made of steel and cast iron. This window frame is from the eleven story high Home Insurance Building which was once located in Chicago at LaSalle and Adams Streets. The building was designed by architect William LeBaron Jenney (1832-1907) and completed in 1883. A 1931 Chicago Tribune article credits the Home Insurance Building with the honor of being ... more
    A window frame from between the third and fourth floors of the Home Insurance Building. It is made of steel and cast iron. This window frame is from the eleven story high Home Insurance Building which was once located in Chicago at LaSalle and Adams Streets. The building was designed by architect William LeBaron Jenney (1832-1907) and completed in 1883. A 1931 Chicago Tribune article credits the Home Insurance Building with the honor of being the “first skyscraper in the world." There is some controversy as to whether the Home Insurance Building or the Tacoma Building in New York City was the first of the "skyscraper" buildings built with the technique of skeleton construction. Skeleton construction consists of a building’s metal framework system of vertical columns and horizontal beams support not only the walls but also the floors. The construction of the building was relatively simple and grew directly out of already well-tested techniques used on three bridges. The building was originally nine stories high, with two more added in 1890. Jenny’s concept of building would revolutionize urban life and lead to bigger, and taller skyscrapers allowed larger amounts of people to live and work in smaller areas. This method of supporting the outer wall remains the standard technique for tall steel- or concrete-framed structures. Without this building method the skyscraper as we know it would’ve not been possible. In 1931 the Home Insurance Building was torn down to make room for the Field Building. How we learn about communities. 16 History; 10-12 Science; 13 Science, Technology and Society. less
  • Format
  • HOMEINSU.jpg