National Road Bridge over the White River, Indianapolis IN: Construction of the National Road westward from Cumberland MD reached Indianapolis in July 1827. A surveyor noted that 'a bridge 356 feet in length would be needed and a site for the west end of the bridge over White River located north of a notched buckeye tree.' A contract for the bridge was let on 26 July 1831 to William Werneg and Walter Blake who completed the bridge in 1834. Pioneer traffice--ox carts, stage coaches, freight wagons--increased tremendously when fording or ferrying over the river was eliminated. However the anticipated naigation of the White River did not materialize. Drawing by Christian Schrader

Chicago citation style
National Road Bridge over the White River, Indianapolis IN: Construction of the National Road westward from Cumberland MD reached Indianapolis in July 1827. A surveyor noted that 'a bridge 356 feet in length would be needed and a site for the west end of the bridge over White River located north of a notched buckeye tree.' A contract for the bridge was let on 26 July 1831 to William Werneg and Walter Blake who completed the bridge in 1834. Pioneer traffice--ox carts, stage coaches, freight wagons--increased tremendously when fording or ferrying over the river was eliminated. However the anticipated naigation of the White River did not materialize. Drawing by Christian Schrader. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/cdm/ref/collection/coll6/id/6698. (Accessed June 25, 2018.)
APA citation style
National Road Bridge over the White River, Indianapolis IN: Construction of the National Road westward from Cumberland MD reached Indianapolis in July 1827. A surveyor noted that 'a bridge 356 feet in length would be needed and a site for the west end of the bridge over White River located north of a notched buckeye tree.' A contract for the bridge was let on 26 July 1831 to William Werneg and Walter Blake who completed the bridge in 1834. Pioneer traffice--ox carts, stage coaches, freight wagons--increased tremendously when fording or ferrying over the river was eliminated. However the anticipated naigation of the White River did not materialize. Drawing by Christian Schrader. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/cdm/ref/collection/coll6/id/6698
MLA citation style
Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <http://contentdm.acpl.lib.in.us/cdm/ref/collection/coll6/id/6698>.
Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.