• Creator
  • Wood, Oliver
  • Created Date
  • 1879
  • Description
  • In 1855, the Quileute met with Washington Territorial Governor, Isaac Stevens, to negotiate and sign a treaty in which the Quileute ceded 800,000 acres in the Quillayute River Basin to the U.S. government in exchange for fishing, hunting and gathering rights as well as health care, schooling and life at the Quinault Reservation. In 1832, Charles L. Willoughby was born in Connecticut. At age twenty-one, he took charge of a vessel and travelled ... more
    In 1855, the Quileute met with Washington Territorial Governor, Isaac Stevens, to negotiate and sign a treaty in which the Quileute ceded 800,000 acres in the Quillayute River Basin to the U.S. government in exchange for fishing, hunting and gathering rights as well as health care, schooling and life at the Quinault Reservation. In 1832, Charles L. Willoughby was born in Connecticut. At age twenty-one, he took charge of a vessel and travelled to Pacific Coast ports. In the early 1860s, he arrived in the Puget Sound and was a captain in the Coast Survey until 1865. In 1865, he married Sara Cheney, a schoolteacher in Port Townsend. In 1877, Willoughby was the Indian Agent at the Neah Bay Reservation where the Makah tribe resides. Charges were filed against him concerning his administration of the reservation. The charges were later dismissed in his favor and in the 1880s, he was an agent at the Quinault Reservation where the Quinault and Queets tribe lived as well as the... less
  • Format
  • text
    Letter (correspondence)
    Scanned from original text or image at 400 dpi saved in TIFF format, resized and enhanced using Adobe Photoshop, and imported as JPEG2000 using Contentdm software's JPEG2000 Extension. 2006