• Creator
  • Wilson, Ernest Henry, 1876-1930
  • Created Date
  • 1923-10-28
  • Description
  • Pinus rigida Massachusetts (Wareham) Cape Cod. (M-7) is a Pinus rigida from Wareham, Massachusetts (Cape Cod), situated near a house. Cape Cod and Long Island, where these trees still flourish, were once pitch pine forests (Virginia Barlow, “Pitch Pine,” Northern Woodlands, March 1, 2010 http://northernwoodlands.org/articles/article/pitch-pine). This photograph was taken on October 28, 1923. It has leaves that grow in threes, the cones are sha... more
    Pinus rigida Massachusetts (Wareham) Cape Cod. (M-7) is a Pinus rigida from Wareham, Massachusetts (Cape Cod), situated near a house. Cape Cod and Long Island, where these trees still flourish, were once pitch pine forests (Virginia Barlow, “Pitch Pine,” Northern Woodlands, March 1, 2010 http://northernwoodlands.org/articles/article/pitch-pine). This photograph was taken on October 28, 1923. It has leaves that grow in threes, the cones are sharp and rigid, and the bark is rough and sometimes quite black, which is why it is also called “black pine” (George Emerson, Trees and Shrubs of Massachusetts [Boston: Little Brown Emerson, 79). Barlow says that its “survival mechanisms take a toll on appearance, and that many of these trees have “irregular profiles,” which “include heavy, lopsided lower branches, and many years’ worth of aged cones blacken the crown” (Barlow 2010). Emerson and Wilson both noted that the tree could withstand the elements of wind and rain when “lashed by the sea,” (Wilson 174) and Emerson said that for this reason it thrives on Cape Cod (86). In her study about the nature of Cape Cod, Beth Schwarzman mentions that pitch pines are flammable, but especially well-adapted to surviving and regrowing after fire, and that their serotinous cones actually don’t open until they are heated by fire (Beth Schwarzman, The Nature of Cape Cod [Lebanon, N.H.: University Press of New England, 2002], p. 31.) Wilson mentions “green sprouts that grow on its trunk,” (174) by which he means that the stump of this tree sprouts when it is cut down. The sprouts do not grow to be very tall, but they flourish. This trait is evidently unique, and this is the only variety of pine tree that has these resurrective properties (Emerson 88). less
  • Format
  • Photographs
    Glass negatives
  • Rights
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