• Creator
  • United States. Office of War Information
  • Created Date
  • 3-22-02
  • Description
  • Poster, color, 28 x 20 in., published by the United States Government Printing Office. In 1942 rationing of resources and materials, which were needed for the war effort, began. Automobile manufacturers stopped making cars and began producing tanks and aircraft. Rubber for tires became scarce as a result of Japan's successful invasion of Malaya and the Dutch East Indies. Gasoline, for civilians, was rationed. Every car displayed an "A", "B", o... more
    Poster, color, 28 x 20 in., published by the United States Government Printing Office. In 1942 rationing of resources and materials, which were needed for the war effort, began. Automobile manufacturers stopped making cars and began producing tanks and aircraft. Rubber for tires became scarce as a result of Japan's successful invasion of Malaya and the Dutch East Indies. Gasoline, for civilians, was rationed. Every car displayed an "A", "B", or "C" gas ration sticker on the windshield. "A" meant that trips taken by the driver were not essential. "B" indicated that the driver used his car for his work, for instance a traveling salesman. "C" was issued to doctors, law enforcement officers, or other persons whose work was deemed essential. "A" sticker drivers were allowed only 3 gallons of gasoline per week. To conserve gas, civilians were also asked to form carpools and avoid unneccesary trips. As an extra conservation measure, the maximum speed limit was reduced to 35 miles per hour. World War II. 16 History; 14 Political systems. less
  • Format
  • Ww20149p.jpg