• Creator
  • Sullivan, Annie, 1866-1936
  • Created Date
  • 1887
  • Description
  • Sense is very acute. I have not been able yet to tell about her taste. She is remarkably well developed physically. Has an erect frame and a clear rosy complexion. She has never been sick since the terrible sickness which left her as she is. I saw the family physician the other day and he said she had congestion of the brain. He also said it might have been caused from an overdose of quinine. He left orders to rub Helen, who was sick, in quini... more
    Sense is very acute. I have not been able yet to tell about her taste. She is remarkably well developed physically. Has an erect frame and a clear rosy complexion. She has never been sick since the terrible sickness which left her as she is. I saw the family physician the other day and he said she had congestion of the brain. He also said it might have been caused from an overdose of quinine. He left orders to rub Helen, who was sick, in quinine saying that her life might depend upon the application. It seems that they were so anxious that the poor little thing received three applications of this medicine one from her father, one from her mother and one from her aunt. Of course they do not know how serious their mistake was and not the least idea that they may been the cause of this dreadful calamity. Helen loves dearly to play in the open air and laughs and frolics with the little negros as if she had... Handwritten letter from Anne Sullivan to Michael Anagnos, Director of Perkins School for the Blind. Anagnos was responsible for sending Anne Sullivan to Tuscumbia, Alabama to teach Helen Keller. The letter describes Sullivan's first impressions upon her arrival in Alabama. Annie M. Sullivan. less
  • Format
  • Correspondence
    Letter
  • Rights
  • Samuel P. Hayes Research Library, Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA. Contact host institution for more information.