• Creator
  • Arsenian, Seth
  • Created Date
  • 1969-08
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • This book titled “The Humanics Philosophy of Springfield College,” was written by Dr. Seth Arsenian, Springfield College’s first Distinguished Professor of Humanics, in 1969. It is not known how this copy of the book was produced, but it is not a direct facsimile of the print version. It assumed that the text is the same as the print version. Arsenian, a faculty member who taught psychology at the college, filled the position of Distinguished ... more
    This book titled “The Humanics Philosophy of Springfield College,” was written by Dr. Seth Arsenian, Springfield College’s first Distinguished Professor of Humanics, in 1969. It is not known how this copy of the book was produced, but it is not a direct facsimile of the print version. It assumed that the text is the same as the print version. Arsenian, a faculty member who taught psychology at the college, filled the position of Distinguished Professor of Humanics from 1966-1969. The purpose of the position was to catalyze a renewal of consciousness in the Humanics philosophy. This was done by annually mandating the Distinguished Professor of Humanics to give a lecture on the definition of Humanics and what the concept means to them. Arsenian started this tradition in 1967 with his speech titled, “The Meaning of Humanics,” in which he described the concept as a set of ideas, values, and goals that make our college distinct from other colleges and make commitment and unity toward commonly sought goals possible. Arsenian’s book further contributed to defining the Humanics Philosophy at Springfield College. In the preface of the book, Arsenian says, “a college without a philosophy is a ship without a rudder…conversely, a college guided by a coherent and continuous philosophy, other things being equal, will move consistently on its chosen course and will fulfill its intended mission.” Arsenian describes how the founders of Springfield College made the college unique in that it was not just another college of liberal arts in the region of the Pioneer Valley. Springfield College was built with by men who were Christian idealist with strong humanistic inclinations that helped build the tradition of the college’s Humanics Philosophy. Arsenian states that the purpose of his book was to keep the Humanics Philosophy as one that is not static, but dynamic, so that it may undergo re-examination, re-evaluation, and re-creation over the years to maintain its strength, confidence, and clarity. Arsenian states that many individuals helped contribute to the creation of this volume, however, the idea for such a book started in the minds of three people: Professor John J. O’Connor, Charles F. Weckwerth, and Arsenian himself. A small committee met informally during Arsenians tenure as Distinguished Professor of Humanics from 1966-1969, and ideas were crystallized into formation of a publication that would present the story of Humanics to those interested both on and off campus. Aresnian goes on to list several others who were integral in the process for collating material for the manuscript. The contents of the book begin with the historical development of the concept of Humanics at Springfield College, and go on to discuss each dimension of the Springfield College Triangle: spirit, mind, and body. There is also a chapter on the whole man, on Humanics and higher education, and the community at large. The Chapters of the book are listed below: CONTENTS Preface I. The Historical Development of the Concept of Humanics at Springfield College II. The Physical Dimension III. The Intellectual Dimension IV. The Spiritual Dimension, by Fred Gladstone Bratton V. The Whole Man VI. Humanics and Higher Education VII. The Collegiate Community VIII. The Community at Large IX. The Humanization of Man X. The Possible Dream, by President Wilbert E. Locklin In the final chapter of Arsenian’s book by President Wilbert E. Locklin, Locklin concludes that those who share the value of the Humanics philosophy at Springfield College will continue to re-dedicate themselves, as their predecessors did so often, to continue to shape the Humanics Philosophy in a dynamic way and to strengthen the tradition of the college’s mission. Locklin states that the “dream” of the college is not a dream, but a reality, and had carrying out the Humanics Philosophy been “impossible” it would have ceased to exist long ago. Humanics is a word that has a special meaning in the history and philosophy of Springfield College, as well as in the college’s motto of “Spirit, Mind, and Body.” The Oxford English Dictionary defines Humanics as, “the subject or study of human affairs or relations, especially of the human element of a problem or situation as opposed to the mechanical.” In 1962, Dr. Glenn Olds, President of Springfield College at the time, began to wonder why this name was given to the intended philosophy of the college by Dr. Laurence Locke Doggett, Springfield College’s first full-time president. Olds acknowledged that the practices of the faculty were in large part consistent with the Humanics philosophy, but he believed that a more self-conscious application would improve chances of its continuity and survival. less
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