• Creator
  • Galvani, Luigi, 1737-1798
  • Created Date
  • 8-19-02
  • Description
  • This is a replica of Luigi Galvani’s 1780 apparatus. It includes a frictional electrostatic machine, insulating stand, a Leyden jar (a glass bottle coated inside with tinfoil and having a brass rod connected to a knob passing through a cork) and frog legs. Luigi Galvani (1737-1798) was an Italian physician. While dissecting a frog in front of a classroom of students in 1780, his scalpel accidentally touched a nerve in the frog's leg. Nearby, a... more
    This is a replica of Luigi Galvani’s 1780 apparatus. It includes a frictional electrostatic machine, insulating stand, a Leyden jar (a glass bottle coated inside with tinfoil and having a brass rod connected to a knob passing through a cork) and frog legs. Luigi Galvani (1737-1798) was an Italian physician. While dissecting a frog in front of a classroom of students in 1780, his scalpel accidentally touched a nerve in the frog's leg. Nearby, an electrostatic machine with a charge already built up, discharged an electric spark. This spark passed through the scalpel and then through the frog's leg to the zinc plate underneath causing the frog to convulse violently. Galvani had accidentally discovered electric current. Assuming this reaction was caused by atmospheric charges, Galvani hung up frog legs from an iron trellis in his garden. When storm clouds passed overhead, he observed the same reaction he had observed in the classroom. Galvani was able to repeat these results indoors with two different metallic strips. These experiments caused great interest throughout Europe and stimulated laboratory study of electricity around the world. In fact the word 'galvanized' (the continuous flow of electricity) is derived from Galvani’s name. Bauabstalt Modell and Apparatebau built this model of Galvani’s Apparatus for the Museum of Science and Industry. American communities in history. 16 History; 10-12 Science; 13 Science, Technology and Society. less
  • Format
  • GALVANIS.jpg