• Creator
  • Crampton, C. Ward (Charles Ward), 1877-1964
  • Created Date
  • 1901
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • This photo has two unidentified shirtless boys wearing dress pants and shoes. They are standing back to back; the one on the left is significantly shorter with poor posture while the one on the right is significantly taller with good posture. Notes on the back seem to indicate that the boy on the right is chronologically younger than the boy on the left, though he looks physiologically older. Charles Ward Crampton (May 26, 1877 - 1964), direct... more
    This photo has two unidentified shirtless boys wearing dress pants and shoes. They are standing back to back; the one on the left is significantly shorter with poor posture while the one on the right is significantly taller with good posture. Notes on the back seem to indicate that the boy on the right is chronologically younger than the boy on the left, though he looks physiologically older. Charles Ward Crampton (May 26, 1877 - 1964), director of Physical Training for New York public schools, took this photograph in 1901. He studied the differences between physiological and chronological age, and with this information he created three categories: (1) Boys arrived at puberty--postpubescent; (2) boys approaching maturity--pubescent; (3) boys not yet approaching maturity--prepubescent. From this he decided that physiological age should be considered in grading, not only for physical culture classes but for all high school or continuation classes. Crampton was a physician, medical researcher, and teacher. Born in New York City, he attended the College of the City of New York, New York University, and in 1900 graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. His major contributions to the medical field include work with geriatrics and gerontology, adolescent hygiene and physical fitness, posture, and blood pressure and circulatory systems. He created what is today known as the Crampton Test or the Crampton Test for Fatal Shock, which measures the physical condition and resistance of one’s pulse and blood pressure in the resting and standing positions. Crampton was a major in the U.S. Army Medical Reserve and acted as Special Adviser to the U.S. Department of the East during World War I. From 1934 to 1937, Crampton regularly wrote columns for the Boy Scouts of America’s magazine Boys’ Life. Crampton was a strong advocate of preventative medicine and the maintenance of a personal medical record by individuals, and served as Chairman of the Committee on Physical Fitness through the Federal Security Agency, Chairman of the Committee on the Health of Adolescents, and the chairman for the sub-committee on Geriatrics and Gerontology through the medical society of New York County. There appears to be a few water stains on the photo; Notes on back say, "Illustrating the importance of Physiological Age; The Tall boy is younger in chronological (?) age than the short boy.; 16-1; 15-6m; Picture taken at H.S. of Commerce moved 1905. less
  • Format
  • Photographs
  • Rights
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