The navigation officer on a Boeing 707 aircraft, leaving Rhein Main Air Base, Germany, plots a course using a laptop computer in connection with the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (J-STARS). J-STARS is a long range, air-to-ground surveillance and battle management system. When in flight the radar can detect and track more than 120 miles of terrain providing the battle commander with invaluable information about troop movement and position. A 40-foot radome under the forward part of the fuselage houses the phased-array radar antenna. The information is fed to the 17 Army and Air Force operators who have access to the radar data in real-time via on-board large-screen graphics...

Chicago citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-. The navigation officer on a Boeing 707 aircraft, leaving Rhein Main Air Base, Germany, plots a course using a laptop computer in connection with the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (J-STARS). J-STARS is a long range, air-to-ground surveillance and battle management system. When in flight the radar can detect and track more than 120 miles of terrain providing the battle commander with invaluable information about troop movement and position. A 40-foot radome under the forward part of the fuselage houses the phased-array radar antenna. The information is fed to the 17 Army and Air Force operators who have access to the radar data in real-time via on-board large-screen graphics.... 1996-02-19. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6503687. (Accessed July 22, 2018.)
APA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-, (1996-02-19) The navigation officer on a Boeing 707 aircraft, leaving Rhein Main Air Base, Germany, plots a course using a laptop computer in connection with the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (J-STARS). J-STARS is a long range, air-to-ground surveillance and battle management system. When in flight the radar can detect and track more than 120 miles of terrain providing the battle commander with invaluable information about troop movement and position. A 40-foot radome under the forward part of the fuselage houses the phased-array radar antenna. The information is fed to the 17 Army and Air Force operators who have access to the radar data in real-time via on-board large-screen graphics.... Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6503687
MLA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6503687>.
Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.