• Creator
  • Harry Lemen, photographer
  • Created Date
  • 1927
  • Description
  • In 1851, John Brough, president of the first railway that ran through Madison and Governor of Ohio, built Cravenhurst. Three stories high, made of brick, the home was located on a ten acre farm on Michigan Road on the brow of the hill, in what is now known as North Madison. It boasted at least 14 rooms that Mr. Brough furnished lavishly. There were French gilt chandeliers, pier glass windows and bell pulls to summon servants. In 1855, J. F. D.... more
    In 1851, John Brough, president of the first railway that ran through Madison and Governor of Ohio, built Cravenhurst. Three stories high, made of brick, the home was located on a ten acre farm on Michigan Road on the brow of the hill, in what is now known as North Madison. It boasted at least 14 rooms that Mr. Brough furnished lavishly. There were French gilt chandeliers, pier glass windows and bell pulls to summon servants. In 1855, J. F. D. Lanier bought the home and presented it to his daughter, Drusilla Cravens. A broad porch around two sides of the house was added, probably in the 1890s. The Cravens Family held the home for most of its existence but sometime in the late 1920s or early 1930s J. W. LaGrange made an inn of the home. Mr. LaGrange died in 1933 but his wife continued with the inn for a time. In 1944 the property was conveyed to the Moose Lodge for their meeting place. There were many changes made to the building, making it more compatible for its use as a lodge hall. Again, in 1974, there was reconstruction done. The interior was "radically" changed. The former bowling alley was torn out and the space was converted to a dining and dancing area. The old kitchen was enlarged and re-equipped. The old dining room was remodeled for club functions and meetings. The old stone stables, still standing on the grounds, looks much the same as in earlier days. less
  • Format
  • image, negative