• Creator
  • United States Volley Ball Association
  • Created Date
  • 1951-05-08
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • A certificate given posthumously to William G. Morgan by the United States Volley Ball Association (USVBA) in recognition of his "notable and generous contribution." The certificate, dated May 8, 1951, is framed and signed by the President of the USVBA, George J. Fisher and Secretary, Harold T. Friermood. Morgan invented the game of volleyball while working as a physical director at the Holyoke YMCA in Holyoke, MA. Morgan, a graduate of Spring... more
    A certificate given posthumously to William G. Morgan by the United States Volley Ball Association (USVBA) in recognition of his "notable and generous contribution." The certificate, dated May 8, 1951, is framed and signed by the President of the USVBA, George J. Fisher and Secretary, Harold T. Friermood. Morgan invented the game of volleyball while working as a physical director at the Holyoke YMCA in Holyoke, MA. Morgan, a graduate of Springfield College (then the International YMCA Training School), Class of 1894, recognized the need to create a game that was less strenuous than basketball for the middle aged businessmen that attended the YMCA. The came, originally called "mintonette", combined elements of basketball and badminton. The first official game debuted at a Physical Director's Conference at Springfield College in 1896. It was there that the name was changed to volleyball upon the suggestion of one of Morgan's former professors, Alfred T. Halsted. Morgan left the YMCA in 1897 to begin work with General Electric and Westinghouse but maintained his ties to the college and the game he created. Morgan died in 1942 at the age of 72. This certificate is found in a gold frame within the collection. However the scanned image is of the certificate alone and was scanned through the glass front. less
  • Format
  • Documents
  • Rights
  • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information.