• Created Date
  • 1970
  • Description
  • Senator Henry M. Jackson and Charles A. Lindbergh shared the Belle W. Baruch Foundation's Conservation Prize for 1969. Lindbergh accepted his award earlier in a private ceremony, but attended a luncheon for Jackson on July 6, 1970, in Washington, D.C.Source: Jackson Awarded Conservation Prize. New York Times 1970, July 7, p.22 Belle W. Baruch was the daughter of Bernard M. Baruch, Wall Street financier and presidential advisor. In 1905, Bernar... more
    Senator Henry M. Jackson and Charles A. Lindbergh shared the Belle W. Baruch Foundation's Conservation Prize for 1969. Lindbergh accepted his award earlier in a private ceremony, but attended a luncheon for Jackson on July 6, 1970, in Washington, D.C.Source: Jackson Awarded Conservation Prize. New York Times 1970, July 7, p.22 Belle W. Baruch was the daughter of Bernard M. Baruch, Wall Street financier and presidential advisor. In 1905, Bernard Baruch purchased a 17,500-acre tract of land in Georgetown, South Carolina, that had been home to 11 plantations. Fifty years later, he sold the land to his daughter, Belle, who started a non-profit organization and turned the land into a wildlife refuge called Hobcaw Barony. Hobcaw Barony has a discovery center and is used for ecological research by South Carolina colleges and universities. Source: The Belle W. Baruch Foundation's Web site. less
  • Format
  • Slide
    image
    color
    35 mm.
    Scanned from a photographic print or color slide using a Microtek ScanMaker 9800XL at 100-250 dpi in JPEG format, saved at compression rate 3 and resized to 768x600 ppi. 2007