• Creator
  • Curtis, Edward S.
  • Created Date
  • 1912
  • Description
  • The Skokomish people have traditionally lived along Hood Canal. They moved to the nearby Skokomish Reservation after the Treaty of Point-No-Point (1855). Like other Puget Sound tribes, their lives were centered around the water. The Skokomish are known for their fine cedar baskets.In this 1912 photo by Edward Curtis, two Skokomish women sit by a summer shelter covered with cattail mats. The two baskets with the zigzag, wolf, and dog patterns w... more
    The Skokomish people have traditionally lived along Hood Canal. They moved to the nearby Skokomish Reservation after the Treaty of Point-No-Point (1855). Like other Puget Sound tribes, their lives were centered around the water. The Skokomish are known for their fine cedar baskets.In this 1912 photo by Edward Curtis, two Skokomish women sit by a summer shelter covered with cattail mats. The two baskets with the zigzag, wolf, and dog patterns were made by twining cedar bark (dark) and beargrass (light) on a cattail warp. A cedar canoe sits nearby. less
  • Format
  • image
    photograph
    Scanned from copy negative using Epson Expression 10000XL as 4350 pixel TIFF image in 16-bit grayscale, resized to 700 pixels in the longest dimension and compressed into JPEG format using Photoshop CS4, JPEG quality measurement 4
  • Rights
  • Museum of History & Industry, Seattle