• Creator
  • Unknown
  • Created Date
  • 10-13-03
  • Description
  • Bisque molded doll. It is all one piece except for the moveable detached arms. The arms are moveable by means of a connected elastic thread. The face has painted eyes with eyelashes. The smiling open mouth has red lips and two tiny teeth are seen. The hair is molded with a brown streak from the center of the back of the head to the forehead. It resembles a mohawk. The clothes are molded and form the doll's body. The legs are also part of the m... more
    Bisque molded doll. It is all one piece except for the moveable detached arms. The arms are moveable by means of a connected elastic thread. The face has painted eyes with eyelashes. The smiling open mouth has red lips and two tiny teeth are seen. The hair is molded with a brown streak from the center of the back of the head to the forehead. It resembles a mohawk. The clothes are molded and form the doll's body. The legs are also part of the molded body and end in shoes that are painted blue and appear to be 'mary jane' styles. The word "NIPPON" is incised on the back of the doll. On the front of the doll, the paper sticker reads "HAPPIFAT," and below that, "NIPPON. The Happifat characters followed the Kewpies after 1913 and were designed by Katie Jordan for Borgfelt. Their mohawk hair was a defining characteristic. Their body shape was said to have been inspired by the look of a glandular disease victim. Children of the time enjoyed the look of the Happifats unusual form. Before 1915, the Japanese manufactured under the trademark 'Nippon.' Nippon bisque is of a higher quality than the later Japanese copies. This is probably because after 1915 Japan was more concerned with mass producing cheaper merchandise for the open U.S. market. How we learn about communities; American communities in history; Communities and Geography. 13 Science, Technology and Society; 15 Economics; 16 History; 18 Social Systems. less
  • Format
  • Happifat