• Creator
  • U.S. Senate. Office of Senate Curator. ?-9999
  • Created Date
  • 1936-10-15
  • Publisher
  • Washington Evening Star
  • Description
  • The 1933 bumper crop of hogs and cotton was a threat to the success of the Agricultural Adjustment Act. If the new surplus would have gone on the market in addition to the existing surplus, any hope of raising farm goods prices would have been doomed. As a result, the Secretary of Agriculture, Henry Wallace, ordered the plowing under of 10 million acres of cotton and the slaughter of 6 million baby pigs and 200,000 sows. This decision produced... more
    The 1933 bumper crop of hogs and cotton was a threat to the success of the Agricultural Adjustment Act. If the new surplus would have gone on the market in addition to the existing surplus, any hope of raising farm goods prices would have been doomed. As a result, the Secretary of Agriculture, Henry Wallace, ordered the plowing under of 10 million acres of cotton and the slaughter of 6 million baby pigs and 200,000 sows. This decision produced a moral outcry from Americans, many of whom were ill clad and starving, because the government encouraged reduced food and cotton production. Guy Tugwell, an agricultural economist and part of Franklin Roosevelt's "brain trust," advocated government planning of the nation's agriculture as the solution to low farm prices. Tugwell worked as the assistant secretary of the Department of Agriculture in 1933 and the undersecretary from 1934 to 1936. In 1935 he was put in charge of the Resettlement Administration, which provided financial assistance and social services to displaced tenant farmers and migratory workers. Tugwell was a controversial figure of the New Deal, mistrusted by critics. Berryman showed Wallace wondering about the critical publicity surrounding Tugwell when it was Wallace who ordered the controversial methods of raising farm prices. less
  • Rights
  • Unrestricted