• Creator
  • Moorhouse, Lee
  • Created Date
  • 1898
  • Description
  • Various Plateau Indian tribes in interior Washington and Oregon traditionally put their infants in cradleboards. Being wrapped tightly and laced into the cradleboard seemed to have a calming effect on the babies. Cradleboards were often made of wood, with a covering of leather or fabric. Some were quite plain while others were highly decorated with beadwork and shells. Larger cradleboards were made for the infants as they grew. In this photo, ... more
    Various Plateau Indian tribes in interior Washington and Oregon traditionally put their infants in cradleboards. Being wrapped tightly and laced into the cradleboard seemed to have a calming effect on the babies. Cradleboards were often made of wood, with a covering of leather or fabric. Some were quite plain while others were highly decorated with beadwork and shells. Larger cradleboards were made for the infants as they grew. In this photo, Cayuse twins Tax-a-Lax and Alompum (Emma and Edna Jones) look out from their undecorated wood and fabric cradleboards. One source identifies the twins as grandnieces of Chief Joseph. The photograph, taken in or before 1898 and also known as "The Cayuse Twins," was one of Lee Moorhouse's most popular images. The Cayuse people, one of many Plateau groups, live in northeastern Oregon. Caption on image: "Copyrighted 1898 by Lee Moorehouse" [sic]Lee Moorhouse, an early Oregon pioneer, took up photography in 1897. He was active in farming,... less
  • Format
  • image
    photograph
    Image/JPEG
    Safety film negatives