• Creator
  • United States. Office of War Information
  • Created Date
  • 11-7-01
  • Description
  • Poster, color, 28 x 21 in., published by the United States Government Printing Office. During wartime frequent contact with family and friends was crucial to maintaining servicemen and women's morale. Often the only contact they were able to have was through the mail. Regular mail can be very bulky, and shipping space on planes was at a premium as they were carrying crucial military supplies to the troops. As a way to reduce the bulk of the ma... more
    Poster, color, 28 x 21 in., published by the United States Government Printing Office. During wartime frequent contact with family and friends was crucial to maintaining servicemen and women's morale. Often the only contact they were able to have was through the mail. Regular mail can be very bulky, and shipping space on planes was at a premium as they were carrying crucial military supplies to the troops. As a way to reduce the bulk of the mail and save valuable space, the U.S. Post Office Department adopted the V-mail system on June 15, 1942. Victory mail, or V-mail as it was popularly known, originated in England where it was used as a way to correspond with British armed forces in the Middle East. V-mail consisted of pre-printed letter and envlope sheets that could be photographed and transferred to microfilm for shipping. The rolls of film were developed at a receiving station, the letter was reproduced about one-quarter size and delivered to the addressee. Some examples of the savings in space and weight: it took 37 mailbags to carry 150,000 one-page letters, with V-mail a single bag could carry the same amount of letters. The weight of the mail was reduced from 2575 pounds to a mere 45. (source: http://www.si.edu/postal/learnmore/vmail.html). World War II. 14 Political systems; 16 History. less
  • Format
  • Ww20055p.jpg