• Created Date
  • ca. A.D. 1325-1521
  • Publisher
  • Yale University Art Gallery
  • Description
  • The figure attached to the front of this brazier, a hollow cylinder for burnt offerings, is a synthesis of two of the most important Aztec deities: the rain god (Tlaloc), and the corn god. Because the two deities represent related natural phenomena - rainfall leads to harvest - the Aztec artist has linked them in a single figure. The crenelated headdress, paper earflares, and the goggle over one eye are familiar iconographical features of Tlal... more
    The figure attached to the front of this brazier, a hollow cylinder for burnt offerings, is a synthesis of two of the most important Aztec deities: the rain god (Tlaloc), and the corn god. Because the two deities represent related natural phenomena - rainfall leads to harvest - the Aztec artist has linked them in a single figure. The crenelated headdress, paper earflares, and the goggle over one eye are familiar iconographical features of Tlaloc, while the corncob necklace and human face are associated with the corn god. The use of a different color scheme for each half of the face - blue-black for the rain god and orange-red for the corn god - further emphasizes this duality of character. less
  • Format
  • 40.8 x 31 x 31.5 cm (16 1/16 x 12 3/16 x 12 3/8 in.)
    Ceramic with white slip or stucco and blue-black, orange-red, red, black, and white pigment
    Postclassic
    Containers
    Decorative Arts, Utilitarian Objects and Interior Design
  • Rights
  • The Yale University Art Gallery makes its photographic images of works believed to be in the public domain or with no known restrictions freely available. Please review the Gallery's image USE terms here, http://artgallery.yale.edu/