• Created Date
  • 1912
  • Description
  • The Olympic Peninsula was largely an uninvestigated region for settlers until the explorations of Lieutenant Joseph O'Neil and Judge James Wickersham in the 1880s and 1890s. At the time, the American frontier was quickly closing and there was increased recognition of the need for a conservation plan to protect the remaining wilderness. The rise of the preservationist movement in the early 1890s, led by individuals such as John Muir, called for... more
    The Olympic Peninsula was largely an uninvestigated region for settlers until the explorations of Lieutenant Joseph O'Neil and Judge James Wickersham in the 1880s and 1890s. At the time, the American frontier was quickly closing and there was increased recognition of the need for a conservation plan to protect the remaining wilderness. The rise of the preservationist movement in the early 1890s, led by individuals such as John Muir, called for the government to take greater care of land which was quickly being usurped for personal and commercial interests. In 1891, Congress passed the Forest Reserve Act, allowing the president to set aside parcels of forested land as public reservations regardless of their commercial value. Within the year, President Harrison created 15 reserves encompassing 13 million acres of land including the addition of land to the Yellowstone National Park, already established by President Ulysses Grant in 1872. On February 22, 1897, President Cleveland... less
  • Format
  • text
    Letter (correspondence)
    Scanned from original text or image at 200 dpi saved in TIFF format, resized and enhanced using Adobe Photoshop, and imported as JPEG2000 using Contentdm software's JPEG2000 Extension. 2012