• Creator
  • Unknown
  • Created Date
  • 10-06-03
  • Description
  • This pair of red wool trousers with gold metal thread embroidery is part of a Zouave Officer's uniform worn by Colonel Harmon D. Hull, Duryee Zouaves (5th NY Volunteer Infantry) and the 2nd Battalion Duryee Zouaves (165th NY Volunteer Infantry). Unlike most Civil War uniforms these Zouave trousers are baggy with pleats front and back just below the waistband. The trousers are hemmed but not cuffed. Six small gold metal buttons, stamped on fron... more
    This pair of red wool trousers with gold metal thread embroidery is part of a Zouave Officer's uniform worn by Colonel Harmon D. Hull, Duryee Zouaves (5th NY Volunteer Infantry) and the 2nd Battalion Duryee Zouaves (165th NY Volunteer Infantry). Unlike most Civil War uniforms these Zouave trousers are baggy with pleats front and back just below the waistband. The trousers are hemmed but not cuffed. Six small gold metal buttons, stamped on front "Brooks Brothers, N. Y.," close the fly. Six larger versions of the same button are sewn around the waistband on the outside. A short, red wool two-piece belt is sewn at the back, center just below the waistband. The belt sections are belted together with a two-prong, rectangular gold metal buckle stamped "SOLLDE" on one side and "PARIS" and "1864" on reverse. There is tan cloth interfacing around the waist and leg hems. Trousers accompany coat. Colonel Harmon D. Hull's Zouave uniform included a dark blue regulation frock coat and brilliant red trousers. In addition, he wore a blue and gilt sword-belt and matching baldric, a maroon sash, gaiters and epaulets on the shoulders of his coat. Colonel Hull's trousers were different from the traditional Zouave uniform, which had short and very baggy trousers. Colonel Hull's trousers were based on the pattern worn by soldiers in the French Chasseurs. "The trousers worn with the French 1860 pattern chasseur uniform were full but cut in the conventional manner. They were gathered at the waist with pleats, and below the knees into wide cuffs fastened by buckles or buttons. They were always worn with gaiters of some sort. It was common to decorate the fronts of chasseur trousers with knots made of cord or lace, and to run stripes of the same down each side. Normally the material of which these trousers were made was the same as in the jacket, although sky blue in color. Full trousers, cut generally along these lines, were worn by many volunteer regiments, and the great majority of zouave corps were given this sort of garment rather than the actual zouave pattern." Todd, Frederick P. American Military Equipage: 1851-1872. (Providence, R. I.: The Company of Military Historians, 1974), p. 60. Antebellum Society and the Civil War. 16 History. less
  • Format
  • Zouave