• Creator
  • Bry, Theodor de, 1528-1598.
  • Created Date
  • 1590-1590
  • Publisher
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. North Carolina Collection.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Description
  • This illustration of the arrival of the British colonists in 1585 shows the lands called "Weapemeoc" and "Secotan," and Roanoke Island, labeled "Roanoac" in the image. The map is decorated with illustrations of trees, people, forts, ships, and a sea monster. Note: These DeBry engravings do not accurately reflect the inhabitants of North Carolina in the late sixteenth century nor are they accurate reproductions of John White’s drawings. The col... more
    This illustration of the arrival of the British colonists in 1585 shows the lands called "Weapemeoc" and "Secotan," and Roanoke Island, labeled "Roanoac" in the image. The map is decorated with illustrations of trees, people, forts, ships, and a sea monster. Note: These DeBry engravings do not accurately reflect the inhabitants of North Carolina in the late sixteenth century nor are they accurate reproductions of John White’s drawings. The colorist for this volume has contributed to the distortion of the original images by adding a pale skin tone and blonde hair to some of the people and decorating much of the vegetation in colors that are unlike anything that occurs naturally in this part of the world. In the English translation of this text, Thomas Hariot describes this image: "II. The arriual of the Englishemen in Virginia. THe sea coasts of Virginia arre full of Ilãds, wehr by the entrance into the mayne lãd is hard to finde. For although they bee separated with diuers and sundrie large Diuision, which seeme to yeeld conuenient entrance, yet to our great perill we proued that they wear shallowe, and full of dangerous flatts, and could neuer perce opp into the mayne lãd, vntill wee made trialls in many places with or small pinness. At lengthe wee fownd an entrance vppon our mens diligent serche therof Affter that wee had passed opp, and say led ther in for ashort space we discouered a migthye riuer fallnige downe in to the sownde ouer against those Ilands, which neuerthelesswee could not saile opp any thinge far by Reason of the shallewnes, the mouth ther of beinge annoyed with sands driuen in with the tyde therfore saylinge further, wee came vnto a Good biggyland, the Inhabitante therof as soone as they saw vs began to make a great an horrible crye, as people which meuer befoer had seene men apparelled like vs, and camme a way makinge out crys like wild beasts or men out of their wyts. But beenge gentlye called backe, wee offred the~ of our wares, as glasses, kniues, babies, and other trifles, which wee thought they deligted in. Soe they stood still, and perceuinge our Good will and courtesie came fawninge vppon vs, and bade us welcome. Then they brought vs to their village in the iland called, Roanoac, and vnto their Weroans or Prince, which entertained vs with Reasonable curtesie, althoug the wear amased at the first sight of vs. Suche was our arriuall into the parte of the world, which we call Virginia, the stature of bodee of wich people, they rattire, and maneer of lyuinge, their feasts, and banketts, I will particullerlye declare vnto yow." Source: Thomas Hariot, "A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia." Frankfort: Theodore De Bry, 1590. less
  • Format
  • 15.5 cm H x 22.5 cm W
    Paper
  • Rights
  • Public domain