• Creator
  • Bry, Theodor de, 1528-1598.; White, John, fl. 1585-1593.
  • Created Date
  • 1590-1590
  • Publisher
  • University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Library. North Carolina Collection.
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Description
  • This image depicts the village of Secoton. There are several buildings shown, three crop fields, and a thriving vegetable garden. A Native American dance ceremony is taking place at the bottom of the image, while elsewhere villagers eat, talk, tend fires, and hunt. Note: These DeBry engravings do not accurately reflect the inhabitants of North Carolina in the late sixteenth century nor are they accurate reproductions of John White’s drawings. ... more
    This image depicts the village of Secoton. There are several buildings shown, three crop fields, and a thriving vegetable garden. A Native American dance ceremony is taking place at the bottom of the image, while elsewhere villagers eat, talk, tend fires, and hunt. Note: These DeBry engravings do not accurately reflect the inhabitants of North Carolina in the late sixteenth century nor are they accurate reproductions of John White’s drawings. The colorist for this volume has contributed to the distortion of the original images by adding a pale skin tone and blonde hair to some of the people and decorating much of the vegetation in colors that are unlike anything that occurs naturally in this part of the world. In the English translation of this text, Thomas Hariot describes this image: "XX. The Tovvne of Secota. THeir townes that are not inclosed with poles aire commonlye fayrer. Then suche as are inclosed, as appereth in this figure which liuelye expresseth the towne of Secotam. For the howses are Scattered heer and ther, and they haue gardein expressed by the letter E. wherin groweth Tobacco which the inhabitants call Vppowoc. They haue also groaues wherin thei take deer, and fields vherin they sowe their corne. In their corne fields they builde as yt weare a scaffolde wher on they sett a cottage like to a rownde chaire, signiffied by F. wherin they place one to watche for there are suche nomber of fowles, and beasts, that vnless they keepe the better watche, they would soone deuoure all their corne. For which cause the watcheman maketh continual cryes and noyse. They sowe their corne with a certaine distance noted by H. otherwise one stalke would choke the grow the of another and the corne would not come vnto his rypeurs G. For the leaves therof are large, like vnto the leaues of great reedes. They haue also a seuerall broade plotte C. whear they meete with their neighbours, to celebrate their cheefe solemne feastes as the 18. picture doth declare: and a place D. whear after they haue ended their feaste they make merrie togither. Ouer against this place they haue a rownd plott B. wher they assemble themselues to make their solemne prayers. Not far from which place ther is a lardge buildinge A. wherin are the tombes of their kings and princes, as will appere by the 22. figure likewise they haue garden notted bey the letter I. wherin they vse to sowe pompions. Also a place marked with K. wherin the make a fyre att their solemne feasts, and hard without the towne a riuer L. from whence they fetche their water. This people therfore voyde of all couetousnes lyue cherfullye and att their harts ease. Butt they solemnise their feasts in the nigt, and therfore they keepe verye great fyres to auoyde darkenes, ant to testifie their loye." Source: Thomas Hariot, "A Briefe and True Report of the New Found Land of Virginia." Frankfort: Theodore De Bry, 1590. less
  • Format
  • 32 cm H x 22 cm W
    Paper
  • Rights
  • Public domain