• Creator
  • Coquemer Imprimeur, Paris
  • Created Date
  • 1918
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • Two classical columns frame the words: "Le Foyer du Soldat est le trait d'union entre la ligne de bataille et la vision de la paix qui rendra les foyers familiaux Il aide a combattre a vivre, a esperer" on this World War I poster. The quote is attributed to General Malleterre, war critic for Paris Temps (1858-1923). Under his name is the YMCA emblem along with the words, "Les Foyers du Soldat" and "Union Franco-Americaine." The bottom of the p... more
    Two classical columns frame the words: "Le Foyer du Soldat est le trait d'union entre la ligne de bataille et la vision de la paix qui rendra les foyers familiaux Il aide a combattre a vivre, a esperer" on this World War I poster. The quote is attributed to General Malleterre, war critic for Paris Temps (1858-1923). Under his name is the YMCA emblem along with the words, "Les Foyers du Soldat" and "Union Franco-Americaine." The bottom of the poster reads "coquemer imp. paris" and "Visa No. 13021." The architrave is heavily decorated with a laurel and oak leaf wreath, patriotic ribbons, and the French and American flags. The left capital has the United States' national emblem, while the right has France's national emblem. Rising from behind each emblem are the flags of the Allied Nations, including Great Britain, China, Portugal, Greece, Serbia, Belguim, Italy, Montenegro, Cuba, Brazil, and Japan. The artist is unknown. Les Foyers du Soldat set up canteens for soldiers to go to while on leave, providing a place to sleep, relax, and eat. General Malleterre published the article "How Battles are Fought Today" in Harper's Magazine (October, 1917) and the article "How the War Was Won" in Harper's 1920 Pictorial Library of The World War. In an excerpt of a letter from the front, he writes, "An armistice [. . .] even with the obligation to evacuate invaded territory and Alsace-Lorraine, would allow the German command to withdraw its armies in security to a distance sufficient to give time to reform the ranks in preparation for the moment when Berlin would denounce the allies' conditions as impossible" (Spokesman Review, 10-10-1918). Very small tears at the top and bottom of right-hand side. less
  • Format
  • Documents
  • Rights
  • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information.