Two of the most promising mine countermeasures (MSM) systems in the U. S. Navy's inventory are the Remote Minehunting Operational Prototype (RMOP) and the Marine Mammal (dolphin) System. The EMOP was developed at Coastal systems Station of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division. The MMS dolphins are normally housed in open-water enclosures and work untethered in the open ocean. Although free to swim away and join wild dolphins, these Navy mine hunters choose to stay and work with their handlers and have proved extremely reliable since first introduction to the Navy in the early 1970s. Exact Date Shot Unknown

Chicago citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994. Two of the most promising mine countermeasures (MSM) systems in the U. S. Navy's inventory are the Remote Minehunting Operational Prototype (RMOP) and the Marine Mammal (dolphin) System. The EMOP was developed at Coastal systems Station of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division. The MMS dolphins are normally housed in open-water enclosures and work untethered in the open ocean. Although free to swim away and join wild dolphins, these Navy mine hunters choose to stay and work with their handlers and have proved extremely reliable since first introduction to the Navy in the early 1970s. Exact Date Shot Unknown. 1995-01-01. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6495206. (Accessed October 21, 2018.)
APA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994, (1995-01-01) Two of the most promising mine countermeasures (MSM) systems in the U. S. Navy's inventory are the Remote Minehunting Operational Prototype (RMOP) and the Marine Mammal (dolphin) System. The EMOP was developed at Coastal systems Station of Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren Division. The MMS dolphins are normally housed in open-water enclosures and work untethered in the open ocean. Although free to swim away and join wild dolphins, these Navy mine hunters choose to stay and work with their handlers and have proved extremely reliable since first introduction to the Navy in the early 1970s. Exact Date Shot Unknown. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6495206
MLA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6495206>.
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