• Creator
  • Wyld, James, 1812-1887
  • Created Date
  • 1836
  • Publisher
  • J. Wyld
    London
  • Description
  • After the American Revolution, many British Loyalists left their homes in the thirteen colonies and moved to Canada, settling in the region north of Lakes Erie and Ontario and south of the Ottawa River. By 1791, the province of Quebec was divided into Upper and Lower Canada as depicted on this 1836 map. Lower Canada remained an area of French culture and settlement, but Upper Canada became a center for British settlement as reflected in the tr... more
    After the American Revolution, many British Loyalists left their homes in the thirteen colonies and moved to Canada, settling in the region north of Lakes Erie and Ontario and south of the Ottawa River. By 1791, the province of Quebec was divided into Upper and Lower Canada as depicted on this 1836 map. Lower Canada remained an area of French culture and settlement, but Upper Canada became a center for British settlement as reflected in the transplanting of place names from England especially for counties or districts--London, Globe, Midland, Norfolk, New Castle, Northumberland, and York. In addition, the subdivision of counties into townships with rectangular shapes followed an American pattern instituted in western New York State in the 1790s, also shown on this map. With the establishment of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, Upper Canada became Ontario and Lower Canada was again known as Quebec. Featured in the Faces & Places Exhibit, Kravis Center, Palm Beach, FL, since 2005. MB (BRL). [James Wyld]. less
  • Format
  • Maps
  • Rights
  • No known copyright restrictions. This work is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share Alike License (CC BY-NC-SA).