• Creator
  • U.S. Senate. Office of Senate Curator. ?-9999
  • Created Date
  • 1907-01-13
  • Publisher
  • Washington Post Company.
  • Description
  • This illustration entitled, "Tillman - The Senatorial Brothers - Foraker", by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, which appeared in the Washington Post on January 13, 1907, depicts Joseph B. Foraker of Ohio and Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina showing their solidarity in opposition to The Senate Committee on Military Affairs investigation and subsequent agreement with President Theodore Roosevelt's ruling with regard to the rioting of black soldie... more
    This illustration entitled, "Tillman - The Senatorial Brothers - Foraker", by cartoonist Clifford Berryman, which appeared in the Washington Post on January 13, 1907, depicts Joseph B. Foraker of Ohio and Benjamin Tillman of South Carolina showing their solidarity in opposition to The Senate Committee on Military Affairs investigation and subsequent agreement with President Theodore Roosevelt's ruling with regard to the rioting of black soldiers in Brownsville, Texas on August 13, 1906. These two made a strange pair as they were often on opposite sides of issues. Angered by insults from white residents, unidentified black soldiers from Companies B, C and D of the 25th U.S. Infantry in Brownsville, Texas rioted violently on August 13, 1906. President Roosevelt ordered an investigation but could not identify specific soldiers. In November, Roosevelt ordered 159 soldiers from the three companies and eight others to be dishonorably discharged due to their silence. The Senate Committee on Military Affairs conducted its own investigation and a majority of the members supported the decision, but Senator Foraker of Ohio and Senator "Pitchfork Ben" Tillman of South Carolina stood out against this ruling. This Republican and Democrat make a strange pair since they were often on opposite sides of issues. Cartoonist Clifford Berryman shows the two high-stepping to the tune of a black banjo player. Berryman's teddy bear, high on a tree stump utters the comment of many "This must be the millennium" as he looks on the dancing pair. less
  • Rights
  • Unrestricted