• Creator
  • Early American Museum
  • Created Date
  • 8-1-00
  • Description
  • Two headed wrench, marked "Ford" on the obverse, "1917" on the reverse. Probably used for a Model T. Found in the Chesebro blacksmith shop. This Ford wrench comes from the Chesebro Blacksmith Shop which operated in Livingston County, Illinois until the 1920s. The brothers who owned it did traditional blacksmithing jobs such as shoeing horses, but they also worked on cars. Henry Ford was a master at mass production. He introduced a chain driven... more
    Two headed wrench, marked "Ford" on the obverse, "1917" on the reverse. Probably used for a Model T. Found in the Chesebro blacksmith shop. This Ford wrench comes from the Chesebro Blacksmith Shop which operated in Livingston County, Illinois until the 1920s. The brothers who owned it did traditional blacksmithing jobs such as shoeing horses, but they also worked on cars. Henry Ford was a master at mass production. He introduced a chain driven assembly line in 1913, and by 1914 his workers were building over a thousand Fords a day. Fords were cheap and they came without any amenities. You had to install your own bumpers, speedometer, temperature gauge, or any thing else comfortable you wanted on the car. Certainly the Chesebro brothers did some of this kind of work at their shop. How we learn about communities. 16 History; 15 Economics. less
  • Format
  • 98.16.2571.jpg