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  • Died 1894. President of Union Market Bank in 1883-4, Officer of the Watertown Savings Bank, Manager of Pratt's Foundry on Main Street. Lived at 120 Mount Auburn Street. Manage of Walker and Pratt Manufacturing Company. Shaw was selectman 1874-5, 1880, 1881, 1882-3, 1884-5 according to the Town Directory. He ran for senator. Hon. Oliver Shaw, senator elect from the Second Middlesex district, died at his residence in Watertown, Mass., of pneumon... more
    Died 1894. President of Union Market Bank in 1883-4, Officer of the Watertown Savings Bank, Manager of Pratt's Foundry on Main Street. Lived at 120 Mount Auburn Street. Manage of Walker and Pratt Manufacturing Company. Shaw was selectman 1874-5, 1880, 1881, 1882-3, 1884-5 according to the Town Directory. He ran for senator. Hon. Oliver Shaw, senator elect from the Second Middlesex district, died at his residence in Watertown, Mass., of pneumonia on Dec. 26, 1894. Miles Pratt built a foundry in 1855. A long brick warehouse was flush with the sidewalk on Galen street, the moulding room was flush on Main Street and there were wharves in the Charles River. The factory covered about two acres. As Miles Pratt struggled with his business, he associated himself with Luke Perkins of the grist mill as his superintendant and Oliver Shaw was his manager. It became Pratt and Perkins in 1857. In 1862, the company reformed again and became Miles Pratt and Co. All three came from Carver. MA. Pratt consolidated with W. Walker & Co. The new partner was Arthur Walker of Malden. In 1877, the Company incorporated and became Walker, Pratt & Company. In 1861 the Company went to manufacturing ammunition and gun-carriage castings. They worked with Gen. Thomas Jackson Rodman, Commander of the Watertown Arsenal. In 1880 a fire-proof building was constructed, 264 feet long, sixty feet wide and three stories high on Galen Street. The pattern storeroom on the island, with a solid wall towards Galen Street--that is a wall without windows, although ornamented with piers and arches, - shows on the south side by its tiers of windows, four stories above a solid foundation wall. There is a furnace capable of melting fifteen tons of iron at a blast. The moulding room is 14,000 square feet. Walker and Pratt built homes between the stockyards and Hood Rubber Company for their employees. They built a new brick factory. They found markets all cross the U.S. and Southern Africa for their Pratt furnaces and Crawford stoves. Heating apparatus were made for the Hotel Vendome, Boston and Madison Square Theater in New York City. They also made hot water and steam heater, ranges and steam and hotel cooking apparatus, tin roofing and copper, tin and sheet-iron work. Walker and Pratt endured a strike by the employees for a salary of $2.50 a day. less
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