• Creator
  • Okuda, Kenji
  • Created Date
  • 1942
  • Description
  • In his letter, Okuda discusses the growing restrictions in camp and his changing attitude toward them. He writes "As I examine myself, I am surprised at the callousless and seeming indifference with which I take situations at which I might have boiled up a month or so ago. Several days ago, an order came through banning as contraband all Japanese literature (except religious) and all Japanese phonograph records. What a denial of freedom; more ... more
    In his letter, Okuda discusses the growing restrictions in camp and his changing attitude toward them. He writes "As I examine myself, I am surprised at the callousless and seeming indifference with which I take situations at which I might have boiled up a month or so ago. Several days ago, an order came through banning as contraband all Japanese literature (except religious) and all Japanese phonograph records. What a denial of freedom; more irksome restrictions in a concentration camp!! But I didn't get indignant about it.... I took it as a matter of course, of circumstances. Perhaps the ineffectiveness of my wholehearted protest against the twice daily check-up or nose count, the realization of the futility of trying to buck the Army and its authority has lead me to this apparently gradual change of heart." Okuda also writes that they are expecting news about the move to a new relocation center in the coming weeks. He expresses his own wish to continue his education at Oberlin... less
  • Format
  • text
    Letter (correspondence)
    Scanned from original text or image at 200 dpi saved in TIFF format, resized and enhanced using Adobe Photoshop, and imported as JPEG2000 using Contentdm software's JPEG2000 Extension. 2013