During a visit to the US Naval Aviation Museum, former P2V Neptune aircraft pilot Jack Robinson describes an aerial maneuver to a companion. They are standing beside the "Truculent Turtle," a specially modified P2V-1 Neptune aircraft that set a world's distance record by flying non-stop between Australia and Columbus, Ohio, in 1946, a distance of 11,236 miles

Chicago citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-. During a visit to the US Naval Aviation Museum, former P2V Neptune aircraft pilot Jack Robinson describes an aerial maneuver to a companion. They are standing beside the "Truculent Turtle," a specially modified P2V-1 Neptune aircraft that set a world's distance record by flying non-stop between Australia and Columbus, Ohio, in 1946, a distance of 11,236 miles. 1990-03-01. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6451497. (Accessed July 16, 2018.)
APA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-, (1990-03-01) During a visit to the US Naval Aviation Museum, former P2V Neptune aircraft pilot Jack Robinson describes an aerial maneuver to a companion. They are standing beside the "Truculent Turtle," a specially modified P2V-1 Neptune aircraft that set a world's distance record by flying non-stop between Australia and Columbus, Ohio, in 1946, a distance of 11,236 miles. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6451497
MLA citation style
Department of Defense. American Forces Information Service. Defense Visual Information Center. 1994-. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <http://catalog.archives.gov/id/6451497>.
Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.