• Created Date
  • 1897~
  • Description
  • Tlingit women made finely-woven baskets for the tourist trade and marketed them in towns served by steamship lines. In this photo, three weavers work on baskets using spruce root and grasses, and decorated in a technique known as "false embroidery". Beaded pouches, a basketry-covered flask, and a few other finished curio items are laid out on the grass in front of the women. A baby, wrapped tightly in its cradleboard, sleeps beside its mother,... more
    Tlingit women made finely-woven baskets for the tourist trade and marketed them in towns served by steamship lines. In this photo, three weavers work on baskets using spruce root and grasses, and decorated in a technique known as "false embroidery". Beaded pouches, a basketry-covered flask, and a few other finished curio items are laid out on the grass in front of the women. A baby, wrapped tightly in its cradleboard, sleeps beside its mother, and a glass baby bottle with a long-necked nipple, sits at the foot of the cradleboard.Caption on image: "Native women weaving baskets, Alaska. Copyright by Winter & Pond."Photographers Lloyd V. Winter and Percy E. Pond opened their Juneau, Alaska, studio in 1893, and documented the people and places of southeastern Alaska until the mid-1940s. (Victoria Wyatt, Images from the Inside Passage: An Alaskan Portrait by Winter & Pond, pp. 13-14.). less
  • Format
  • image
    photograph
    Image/JPEG