• Creator
  • W. H. Drew, Stereopticons
  • Created Date
  • 1908-1915
  • Publisher
  • Springfield College
  • Description
  • This lantern slide shows the Shanghai YMCA in China and a portrait of Dr. Max Joseph Exner, who graduated in 1892 from the International YMCA Training School, now known as Springfield College. After graduating, he pursued an advanced degree at Carleton College in Minnesota. Exner worked as a physical director in Minnesota (1894-1897), Massachusetts (1898-1899), and Missouri (1901-1907). From 1908 to 1911, he served as the very first national p... more
    This lantern slide shows the Shanghai YMCA in China and a portrait of Dr. Max Joseph Exner, who graduated in 1892 from the International YMCA Training School, now known as Springfield College. After graduating, he pursued an advanced degree at Carleton College in Minnesota. Exner worked as a physical director in Minnesota (1894-1897), Massachusetts (1898-1899), and Missouri (1901-1907). From 1908 to 1911, he served as the very first national physical director of the recently-formed General Committee of China, Korea, and Hong Kong. While in this position, Exner vigorously promoted the Olympics and organized the first Chinese National Athletic Games, which showcased on hundred and fifty athletes. After returning to the United States, he spent time in Iowa and New Jersey before settling in New York as the Secretary of the International Committee. In 1913, he presented a lecture at Springfield College on the importance and urgency of the Physical Department’s mission in foreign lands. The following year, Springfield awarded Exner an honorary Master of Physical Education degree and invited him to speak at commencement. Exner wrote a number of articles and books on the importance of sex education, including: “The Rational Sex Life for Men” (1917), “The Question of Petting” (1932), and “What You Should Know About Syphilis and Gonorrhea” (1937). He spent the last three years of his life in Newark, New Jersey. Although the YMCA movement was active in China as early as 1870, the first North American YMCA work there dates from 1889. In 1895, the International Committee of the YMCA in North America sent the first American secretary to China. The YMCA’s policy of encouraging indigenous leadership appealed to burgeoning Chinese nationalism. While the Boxer Rebellion briefly halted YMCA activity in China, recovery followed rapidly. The General Committee of China, Korea, and Hong Kong was founded in 1901. The following year, headquarters were established in Shanghai. Involvement by North Americans proved impossible under Communist rule, but a number of Chinese YMCAs persisted. In 1979, relations between the Chinese and American YMCA movements were renewed. less
  • Format
  • Photographs
  • Rights
  • Text and images are owned, held, or licensed by Springfield College and are available for personal, non-commercial, and educational use, provided that ownership is properly cited. A credit line is required and should read: Courtesy of Springfield College, Babson Library, Archives and Special Collections. Any commercial use without written permission from Springfield College is strictly prohibited. Other individuals or entities other than, and in addition to, Springfield College may also own copyrights and other propriety rights. The publishing, exhibiting, or broadcasting party assumes all responsibility for clearing reproduction rights and for any infringement of United States copyright law. Contact host institution for more information.