• Created Date
  • 1936
  • Description
  • It was not under her own name so much as under that of her celebrated pupil that Anne Sullivan Macy became a world figure. She was known, as she wished to be known, and she will be remembered, as she wished to be remembered, as Helen Keller's teacher. She had no other pupil, but her achievement with this single one has placed her, by general acclamation, in the pantheon of great teachers of all time. She was not without forerunners, but her wo... more
    It was not under her own name so much as under that of her celebrated pupil that Anne Sullivan Macy became a world figure. She was known, as she wished to be known, and she will be remembered, as she wished to be remembered, as Helen Keller's teacher. She had no other pupil, but her achievement with this single one has placed her, by general acclamation, in the pantheon of great teachers of all time. She was not without forerunners, but her work was original in the way implied by George Santayana when he ways, "Originality and genius must be largely fed and raised on the shoulders of some old tradition." She had the tradition (though it was not old) in the accomplishment of Dr. Samuel Gridley Howe with Laura Bridgman and other deaf-blind pupils, but, to use the words of the Educational Institute of Scotland which made her an Honorary Fellow in 1932, she proved herself "to be a teacher of genius who made discriminate use of all known methods of reaching the child mind and herself devised many others which anticipated some of the best features in present-day teaching practice." (Mrs. Macy would not approve the word "genius" in this paragraph; for her sake I point out that it is in quotation marks). The words "liberator," "emancipator," and "deliverer," applied to her as they have been by Dr. Maria Montessori (who also called her a pioneer), by Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdick, her British publishers, editorial writers from San Francisco to Zagreb, and others, are synonymous with the word "teacher." Her task when she went to Helen Keller nearly fifty years ago was to liberate a soul; it was the kindest of all good fortunes that gave her a soul worth liberating. "I have never thought that I deserve more praise than other teachers who give the best they have to their pupils," she said. "If their earnest efforts have not released an Ariel from the imprisoning oak, it is no [end of document]. December, 1936, Volume XXX, Number 5 of Outlook For The Blind, published by the American Foundation for the Blind with article on front by Nella Braddy titled: Anne Sullivan Macy: World Figure. Outlook for the Blind. less
  • Format
  • Documents
    Pamphlets
  • Rights
  • Samuel P. Hayes Research Library, Perkins School for the Blind, Watertown, MA. Contact host institution for more information.