Radiolaria Skeletons - This scanning electron microscopy picture, magnified 100 times, shows skeletons of various forms of Radiolaria in sediment cores taken at Site 55 in the Caroline Ridge area of the Western Pacific Ocean by the Deep Sea Drilling Project. In life these tiny organisms llived near the ocean surface, and upon death their skeletons fell to the sea bed to become entombed in the sediments. Drill bit penetration of the ocean floor at the site was 429 feet and the water depth was 9,383 feet. By carefully studying them scientists can determine how long ago they lived and can learn much about the history of the ocean. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for the Deep Sea Drilling Project under contract to the National Science Foundation. Scientific guidance for the Project is provided by the JOIDES Institutions

Chicago citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project. Radiolaria Skeletons - This scanning electron microscopy picture, magnified 100 times, shows skeletons of various forms of Radiolaria in sediment cores taken at Site 55 in the Caroline Ridge area of the Western Pacific Ocean by the Deep Sea Drilling Project. In life these tiny organisms llived near the ocean surface, and upon death their skeletons fell to the sea bed to become entombed in the sediments. Drill bit penetration of the ocean floor at the site was 429 feet and the water depth was 9,383 feet. By carefully studying them scientists can determine how long ago they lived and can learn much about the history of the ocean. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for the Deep Sea Drilling Project under contract to the National Science Foundation. Scientific guidance for the Project is provided by the JOIDES Institutions. 1969. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb12979821. (Accessed December 14, 2018.)
APA citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project, (1969) Radiolaria Skeletons - This scanning electron microscopy picture, magnified 100 times, shows skeletons of various forms of Radiolaria in sediment cores taken at Site 55 in the Caroline Ridge area of the Western Pacific Ocean by the Deep Sea Drilling Project. In life these tiny organisms llived near the ocean surface, and upon death their skeletons fell to the sea bed to become entombed in the sediments. Drill bit penetration of the ocean floor at the site was 429 feet and the water depth was 9,383 feet. By carefully studying them scientists can determine how long ago they lived and can learn much about the history of the ocean. Scripps Institution of Oceanography, of the University of California at San Diego, is managing institution for the Deep Sea Drilling Project under contract to the National Science Foundation. Scientific guidance for the Project is provided by the JOIDES Institutions. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America, https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb12979821
MLA citation style
Deep Sea Drilling Project. Retrieved from the Digital Public Library of America <https://library.ucsd.edu/dc/object/bb12979821>.
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