• Creator
  • Illinois Heritage Association
  • Created Date
  • 02/04/03
  • Description
  • The coin with the reverse reads "V" "Cents", "United States of America," and in small letters, "E Pluribus Unum." There is also a wreath. The coin with the obverse side show a Grecian profile of Liberty wearing a crown that reads "Liberty," and the date, 1888. Around the edge of the coin are thirteen stars that represent the colonies. The phrase, "E Pluribus Unum," (Out of many, one) was first used on the reverse of a half-eagle ($5 gold coin)... more
    The coin with the reverse reads "V" "Cents", "United States of America," and in small letters, "E Pluribus Unum." There is also a wreath. The coin with the obverse side show a Grecian profile of Liberty wearing a crown that reads "Liberty," and the date, 1888. Around the edge of the coin are thirteen stars that represent the colonies. The phrase, "E Pluribus Unum," (Out of many, one) was first used on the reverse of a half-eagle ($5 gold coin) in 1795. For a while it was on all coins with precious metal, then was dropped. In 1873 it became required by law on all United States coins. The phrase did not appear immediately, as it was believed to be optional. It is now on all coins. These coins have ridged edges. This reeding was introduced to discourage counterfeiting and mutilation of coins. It was common for people to file or cut off parts of coins and "recycle" them. The worth of a coin was determined by it's weight. Today, some coins continue to be ridged to assist the blind in identifying them. It helps to distinguish pennies from dimes, for instance. Source: http://www.religioustolerance.org/nat_mott.htm. How We Learn About Communities; Communities and Geography; History of Money. 15 Economics; 16 History. less
  • Format
  • IHA00227.jpg